Categories
DH Commons Event General DH

DH Virtual Discussion Groups – Session 1

The first session of the DH Virtual Discussion Group for ECRs in Belgium, a joint initiative of Ghent CDH and the DH Commons, will be held on Tuesday, 13 October 2020 from 15-16h30 Belgian time. We will meet and will split into breakout rooms to discuss our two materials for this session.

The materials that we will discuss in this session are…

Categories
General DH Job

Post-doc Job Klaxon!

There’s a new job opening at Brown University in the Center for Digital Scholarship ( which is based in the University Library). The opening is for a one-year position as a Diversity in Digital Publishing Postdoctoral Research Associate.

The start date would be January 2021, with a stipend of $60,000 (plus benefits) and an additional $5,000 in funding for research/professional development.

Categories
DH Commons General DH

A List(en) of DH Podcasts

I am a bit of a late comer to podcasts, although I have loved audiobooks (and particularly full-cast adaptations of audiobooks as radio plays – see the BBC’s back catalogue for an amazing line-up) for most of my life. Recently I’ve started listening to academic podcasts more and more, as I find them an interesting way of engaging with intellectual topics in a more off-the-cuff manner than traditional keynotes, articles, or other forms of scholarly communication. To that end, I’ve put together a list of five DH podcasts I’ve discovered and enjoyed recently. These are great for a walk, a commute (remember those?), or a bike ride. I sometimes listen to one while I’m making coffee in the morning to stimulate my brain in a different way. They are not in order of importance, just the order in which I discovered them. Now, bear in mind, because I’m a native English speaker, the list below consists solely of English-language podcasts. If you have any further suggestions for our readers, and especially if you have non-English DH podcast suggestions, pop them in a comment below!

Categories
DH Commons DH Masters Event

DH Virtual Discussion Group for Early Career Researchers in Belgium

Let’s face it: so far, this year has been weird and very stressful. We have been forced to accept a new normal, and while this evolving situation prioritizes our health and safety, it leaves a lot to be desired in terms of collaboration. For members of our community who live alone, or who are far away from family and friends back home, this has been especially difficult, because contact with the research community or colleagues may be the only opportunity we have to socialize with likeminded peers. While we may be separated physically, we still need to find and foster connections, especially for our colleagues embarking on a new adventure in these strange times, such as a PhD or a Master’s program with a digital focus. So take heart, dear readers. All is not lost.

Categories
Open Access Open Scholarship Open Science

What’s in a number? A closer look at Open Access readership data, Part Two

This is Part Two of a two-part series on Open Access Readership Data. To see Part One, click here.


In Part One of this blog series I have already explained how the readership data of the OA books published with the support of the KU Leuven Fund for Fair Open Access are gathered and displayed on our website. However, in order to really show the potential reach and impact of Open Access publishing, I will now break down and analyze the metrics more carefully.

Categories
Open Access Open Scholarship Open Science

What’s in a number? A closer look at Open Access readership data, Part One

This is Part One of a two-part series on Open Access Readership Data. For Part Two, click here.


Open Access (OA) literature is freely available online to be read by anyone, anytime, and anywhere. It is a publishing model that offers an alternative for the traditional method of publishing scholarly output behind a paywall, where articles and books are inaccessible to everyone except a select few with a library subscription or the money to pay for exorbitant individual fees. Broadly speaking, there are two routes to achieving an Open Access publication: the first is Green OA (the author publishes behind a paywall and self-archives a digital copy in a free online repository); and the second is Gold OA (the author publishes an article or book immediately in OA, making it directly available to the public without any costs charged for reading).1 Whereas academic journals that offer Gold OA options have become widespread in the last decade, the transition to Open Access for academic books is lagging behind, despite the fact that monographs are still the leading publishing format in the Humanities and Social Sciences. In order to boost the publication of OA books, KU Leuven Libraries reserved a substantial part of the KU Leuven Fund for Fair Open Access, established in 2018, to help finance OA books published by Leuven University Press (LUP).

  1. This is Open Access in a nutshell. For more detailed information see: https://www.kuleuven.be/open-science/what-is-open-science/scholarly-publishing-and-open-access/open-access-why-and-how []
Categories
DH Commons DH Masters

DH Commons Internships: FAQ

Are you interested in pursuing an internship* in the DH Commons as part of your output for the DH Master’s at KU Leuven? If so, read on!

Categories
DH Commons DH Masters

Internship and Thesis Research on Digital Humanities Centre Projects

As part of my three-month internship at the DH Commons in 2020, I worked on both the DH Commons and the Digital Humanities webpages in close collaboration with Laura Ulens (my fellow intern) and Merisa Martinez, our supervisor and the founder of the Commons. We started from scratch, with a limited team, no physical space, no budget and no reputation to fall back on. Additionally, the Covid-19 pandemic threw us a curve ball, and led to us having to to coordinate all our activities using Skype and Skype for Business. We figured that a good place to start would be to build a web presence for the DH Commons. Both Laura and I collected a corpus of five digital scholarship organizations’ websites, and analyzed them with the aim of making our website fit into the Digital Scholarship Organizations’ online landscape. While Laura had a look at the scholarly communication models used across these websites, I focused on how these organizations posted  their (collaborative) DH projects online.

Categories
DH Commons DH Masters

Internship and Thesis Research on Digital Humanities Centre Blogs

I started my internship at the DH Commons in spring 2020 when the DH Commons web presence was not yet fully configured. Together with the other inaugural DH Commons fellow Tess Dejaeghere, I helped the Keeper of the Commons, Merisa Martinez, to set up this web presence. Tess and I were both writing our theses linked to this internship and were doing corpus research of Digital Humanities Centre (DHC) websites so we could make recommendations for the Commons based on our research. While Tess focussed on how these DHCs highlighted their DH projects online, I studied why DHC blogs should be considered as valid forms of scholarly communication. I also suggested we should create such a blog for the Commons, and this is how the DH Commons blog was born.

Categories
DH Commons

Launching the DH Commons

The following is the text of a talk given by Dr Demmy Verbeke, Keeper of the DH Commons, at the launch of the DH Commons on 15 November 2019.

Before I give the word to professor Siemens, I wanted to provide a little context and give a very short history of how we got to launching the DH Commons. At the outset, I need to stress that this is a personal narrative, making no pretence whatsoever at being an official history. I would therefore also invite you to treat my narrative as you should treat all eyewitness accounts: they might provide privileged insights into certain events, but they are also unreliable, seriously tainted and distorted by the personal views of the narrator, they frequently exaggerate the role and importance of this same narrator and they are certainly one-sided and incomplete.